Oceanic Migrations, SFCMP's WORLD PREMIERE concert inspired by the Angel Island Immigration Station
Sep
14
7:00 PM19:00

Oceanic Migrations, SFCMP's WORLD PREMIERE concert inspired by the Angel Island Immigration Station

SFCMP on STAGE series
Oceanic Migrations

On September 14, 2019, the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players will open their 2019-2020 season with a stunning assembly of forces for the world premiere of a new, concert-length, site-responsive work by Bang On A Can founding composer Michael Gordon.

At the Cowell Theater at Fort Mason Cultural Center, within view of the Golden Gate and San Francisco Bay, SFCMP will present the first ever performance of this piece for twenty-one musicians–joining together for the first time the SF Contemporary Music Players with the Grammy Award-winning vocal octet Roomful of Teeth and Bay Area wind quintet Splinter Reeds. From its seat across the Bay, Angel Island serves as a focal point for this powerful new work's exploration of the larger themes embedded in the history of immigration to the Americas.

The eight-voice ensemble Roomful of Teeth–known for their ongoing work in the study of pan-global vocal styles and the creation of a new repertoire without borders–will be a vehicle for the narrative element, while the adventurous virtuosity of Splinter Reeds and SFCMP will interact with and augment the work's drama through instrumental means. By virtue of its connection to the shared and tangible experiences of diverse peoples in the Bay Area and the larger scope of U.S. history, Gordon's piece will be a watershed exploration of issues at the forefront of our local and national dialogue.

Guests are invited to visit Angel Island: an educational installation about this project will be on view at Immigration Station Barracks, September 7 - 14. All Angel Island ticket holders will receive free access to the evening's concert. Bring your ferry ticket to the concert!

The evening's concert will be preceded by a talk with composer Michael Gordon, archivists, historians, and local residents sharing stories about their family members or their own personal experiences passing through Angel Island years ago.

Enter promo code AIISFfeesaver at checkout to waive all ticket fees!

SCHEDULE

SEPTEMBER 7 - 14, 2019
Location: Angel Island State Park, Tiburon, CA 94920
Educational multimedia installation about the creation and development of this project showing at the historical Immigration Station Barracks on Angel Island. (All patrons with an Angel Island ferry ticket can attend the evening concert for free. Bring your Angel Island ticket to the concert)

SEPTEMBER 14, 2019
Location: Fort Mason Center for Arts and Culture, Cowell Theater, 2 Marina Blvd. SF, CA 94123
7:00pm, Pre-concert discussion with composer Michael Gordon and Bay Area residents who have personal experiences connected to Angel Island facilitated by Eric Dudley
8:00pm, Concert (There will be a post-concert reception following the evening’s performance)

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Family Day 2019 at the Angel Island Immigration Station
Jul
13
9:00 AM09:00

Family Day 2019 at the Angel Island Immigration Station

Imagine spending a beautiful day with family and friends at the Angel Island Immigration Station, learning about one man’s fascinating journey from China and the important impact the Immigration Station had on his and other immigrants’ experience into America. Create a magical memory with your family and see Angel Island in a new perspective by reliving the story of this Chinese immigrant through a 3-D interactive experience as we celebrate Family Day 2019!

Details

Who: You, family, and friends. Participate solo or in a group of up to 6. Young and old can play.

Where: Angel Island Tiburon Ferry, 21 Main St. Belvedere Tiburon, CA 94920

When: Saturday, July 13, 2019 / 9:00am – 4:00pm

Tickets: $25 adults / $15 youth (6 - 18) / Free (under 6)

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Your Family Day ticket includes round trip ferry pass, interactive app, special interactive stations, lunch from the Angel Island Company, performance from Lion Dance ME, and a digital slideshow.

*Note: Space is limited. Reservations mandatory. Children under 18 require adult supervision.

About Family Day 2019

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Our day trip begins days before your actual arrival to Angel Island. You’ll be introduced to Look Lowe himself, a Chinese immigrant and Paper Son that made this courageous journey to Angel Island by downloading an interactive app on your cell phone or iPad. Through this app, you’ll learn how many immigrants were able to bypass the landmark Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 to gain entry to America through Angel Island.

We’ll begin the actual day’s journey, together, at the Tiburon Ferry, to meet your adventure guides for the day. They’ll creatively craft the environment before boarding the ferry that will simulate Look Lowe’s journey to Angel Island.

You'll follow many of Look Lowe’s steps and stories as you visit each area of the Angel Island Immigration Station site and experience unique elements specifically recreated for this day.

All will enjoy lunch and entertainment to close the day and celebrate our shared history as a nation of immigrants. Every person who completes Look Lowe's journey will win a souvenir prize, so come join the fun!

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Schedule

9:00am - Arrive: Angel Island Tiburon Ferry Landing
9:15am - Meet & Greet: Adventure Guides and group creation
9:30am - Last minute logistics / troubleshooting / Receive passenger paperwork
9:45am - Game begins!/Board Ferry
10:00am - Depart to Angel Island
10:15am - Disembark Ferry with Immigrant Status; follow the herding to Angel Island Shuttles
10:30am - Board Shuttles to Immigration Station, execute missions during ride
10:45am - Disembark Shuttles to Station 1
11:00am - Grant Din: Family Tree/ History
11:15am to 1:00pm - Game mission execution
1:00pm - Lunch: Line up at Mess Hall move to performance area to eat
2:00pm - Performance from Lion Dance Me
2:30pm - Award Ceremony
3:45pm - Walk to Angel Island Landing
4:00pm - Group Pic at Angel Island Landing
4:20pm - Depart to Tiburon
4:35pm - Disembark


Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation would like to thank our event partners.

Look Lowe Family Trust

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CAAMFest37 celebrates Asian American film, music, and food in San Francisco and Oakland
May
9
to May 19

CAAMFest37 celebrates Asian American film, music, and food in San Francisco and Oakland

Every year, CAAM proudly presents CAAMFest (formerly the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival). CAAMFest is recognized as the nation’s largest showcase for new Asian American and Asian films, annually presenting approximately 130 works in San Francisco and Oakland. Since 1982, the festival has been an important launching point for Asian American independent filmmakers as well as a vital source for new Asian cinema. In 2018, the festival welcomed over 33,000 participants, including over 250 filmmakers, artists, musicians, culinary creatives, and industry professionals from around the world.

This year, AIISF is proud to co-present two Asian American films connected to Pacific immigration. You can download a one-sheet flyer here.

BEI BEI
Directed by Marion Lipschutz, Rose Rosenblatt

2018 | 90 mins

When a newborn baby dies after her mother attempts suicide while she’s pregnant, is the mother guilty of murder? BEI BEI documents the case against Bei Bei Shuai, a Chinese immigrant whose 2011 prosecution brought international attention to the state of Indiana over the legal concept of feticide and its use to criminalize women who attempt to terminate their own pregnancies. The filmmakers follow Shuai from her release after 435 days in jail without bail to the ultimate resolution of her indictment.

The film provides intriguing insights in the strategy deployed by defense attorney Linda Pence in the court of law and public opinion, and it illuminates the unexpected political motivations of the lawmakers and prosecutors behind the case. But the portrait of Shuai is the most important element of the film, serving to humanize the stories of the hundreds of women who have since been charged with murder under similar circumstances. — Chris Bucoy Brown

New People Cinema
Friday, May 10, 2019
7:40pm

AMC Kabuki 8
Tuesday, May 14, 2019
9:10pm

ALTERNATIVE FACTS: THE LIES OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 9066
Directed by Jon Osaki, Megumi Nishikura

2018 | 79 mins

Filmmaker Jon Osaki traces the fraught racist history of the World War II incarceration of Japanese Americans and untangles the intergenerational trauma of the decades-long redress movement. ALTERNATIVE FACTS: THE LIES OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 9066 offers damning proof that the signing of Executive Order 9066 was the result of political pressure and fabricated evidence of espionage by Japanese Americans. Interviews with the family members of prominent political officials and unsung heroes of redress like Aiko Herzig Yoshinaga illuminate the racism, xenophobia and backhanded political maneuvering led to the forcible internment of 120,000 Japanese Americans.

Bookended by fiery youth testimony, particularly that of Mika Osaki, we bear witness to the rage that often remains unexpressed by previous generations. With nods to the present-day ban on travel to the U.S. from some Muslim-majority countries, Jon Osaki makes a compelling case for solidarity and engagement in this deeply personal and political film. It won an Impact Docs Award and the Best Documentary award at the Political Edge Film Festival.

Roxie Theater
Saturday, May 18, 2019
4:40pm

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Angel Island descendant Lenora Lee and her dance company return to the Immigration Station with their award-winning, multimedia performance of Within These Walls & Dreams of Flight
May
4
to May 19

Angel Island descendant Lenora Lee and her dance company return to the Immigration Station with their award-winning, multimedia performance of Within These Walls & Dreams of Flight

  • Angel Island Immigration Station (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Lenora Lee Dance (LLD) celebrates its Re-Staging of the Award Winning Within These Walls (2017), and the World Premiere of its sequel Dreams of Flight, both site-responsive, immersive, multimedia dance works at the Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco Bay, for three weekends 5/4 - 5/19/19.

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Cross Talk and Connections with a screening of Carved in Silence and discussion moderated by Felicia Lowe
May
3
6:00 PM18:00

Cross Talk and Connections with a screening of Carved in Silence and discussion moderated by Felicia Lowe

Join us for a screening of Felicia Lowe’s Carved in Silence, a documentary about Chinese immigrants detained at Angel Island Immigration Station which was built to enforce the Chinese Exclusion Acts.

Passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 marked the first time in the history of U.S. immigration policy that laborers were banned on the basis of race and denied the right to naturalize as citizens. It led to further restrictions affecting other immigrant groups, setting a precedent that continues to echo down to the present day. How does the past inform the present? What can we learn from history and across communities facing similar challenges?

The distinguished panelists include Judy Yung, historian and Professor Emerita of American Studies at UC Santa Cruz, Bill O. Hing, Director of the Immigration and Deportation Defense Clinic and Dean’s Circle Scholar at University of San Francisco, Lara Kiswani, Executive Director of the Arab Resource and Organizing Center, and Marisela Esparza, Director of Immigrant Rights and Community Engagement at the Dolores Street Community Services and program manager of the San Francisco Immigrant Legal & Education Network. Felicia Lowe will serve as the moderator.

The program is co-presented by Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation.

Carved In Silence, by filmmaker Felicia Lowe, reveals the virtually unknown story of the Exclusion Era -- its genesis, its reality, and it consequences. Focusing on the detention of Chinese immigrants at Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco bay, Carved in Silence translates the impact of public policies into human terms and looks closely at this legacy of a shadow that once darkened the American Dream.

Felicia Lowe is a Bay Area native and award winning independent television producer, director, and writer with 40 years of production experience. Her documentaries; Chinese Couplets, Carved in Silence, Chinatown and China: Land of My Father reveal the unique experiences of Chinese in America while underscoring our common humanity. All her films have been broadcast on PBS and are used in classrooms across the country. She recently directed Pacific Gateway, a 360 virtual reality video on Angel Island Immigration Station. Prior to producing documentaries, she was one of the first Asian female television news reporters and worked on the children’s television series, "The Electric Company." A descendent of Angel Island detainees, she has been recognized as a "Visionary" for her leadership in the preservation and restoration of this National Historic Landmark.

This program is held in conjunction with Then They Came For Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans During WWII and the Demise of Civil Liberties, a special multimedia exhibition featuring imagery by noted photographers commissioned by the U.S. government's War Relocation Authority, including Dorothea Lange and Clem Albers, along with photographers Ansel Adams, Toyo Miyatake and Paul Kitagaki, Jr., as well as a range of artifacts from the period.

Gallery Hours: Wed-Sun, 10 am to 6 pm, FREE and open to the public.www.thentheycame.org

Suggested donation: $5 - $10. No one turned away for lack of funds.

Getting to Then They Came For Me:

The PresidiGo Downtown Shuttle provides FREE roundtrip service to the Presidio. The shuttle picks up at the Transbay Terminal or Embarcadero BART.

If you are driving, be sure that you are driving to the Presidio (zip code 94129), not the 100 Montgomery located downtown.

Ramp access is available at the back of the building on Taylor Road between Sheridan Road and Bliss Avenue. This building is ADA compliant.

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Chang-rae Lee and Eavan Boland  in a Conversation about Diasporic Literature Levinthal Hall, Stanford University
May
1
7:00 PM19:00

Chang-rae Lee and Eavan Boland in a Conversation about Diasporic Literature Levinthal Hall, Stanford University

More than 500,000 immigrants from 80 different countries landed at the Angel Island Immigration Station from 1910-1940.  Today, the Angel Island Immigration Station stands as a symbol of the diaspora - the dispersion of people from their original homeland - that happened then and continues in our contemporary world. Through this event, we explore how that diasporic experience touches us through literature.

Download the event flyer HERE.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Chang-rae Lee, who emigrated from Korea to the United States when he was three, is the author of the novels Native Speaker, A Gesture Life, Aloft, The Surrendered (winner of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize and a Pulitzer Prize Finalist), and On Such A Full Sea, (which was a Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award). His sixth novel will be published in 2019. He is currently the Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods Professor of English at Stanford University. Lee’s numerous awards and citations include the Dos Passos Prize in Literature, the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award, the American Book Award, the Anisfield-Wolf Literary Award, the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, and the NAIBA Book Award for Fiction. He has written stories and articles for The New Yorker, The New York Times, Granta, Conde Nast Traveler, Food & Wine, and many other publications. He was named by The New Yorker as one of the 20 Writers for the 21st Century.

Eavan Boland, a native of Dublin, Ireland, moved with her family to London when she was six, where she first faced anti-Irish sentiment. Boland’s poetry collections include A Poet’s Dublin, A Woman Without a Country, New Collected Poems, An Origin Like Water: Collected Poems 1967-1987, and In Her Own Image. She is also the author of the essay collection A Journey with Two Maps: Becoming a Woman Poet, which won the 2012 PEN Award; Object Lessons: The Life of the Woman and the Poet in Our Time, a volume of prose; and After Every War, an anthology of German women poets. With Mark Strand, she co-edited The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms. Boland’s awards include a Lannan Foundation Award in Poetry, an American Ireland Fund Literary Award, a Jacob’s Award for her involvement in The Arts Programme broadcast on RTÉ Radio, and an honorary degree from Trinity. Boland is the Melvin and Bill Lane Professor of English at Stanford University.

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Survival and Loss: A Joint Discussion of Los Angeles and San Francisco Chinatowns
Jan
31
6:00 PM18:00

Survival and Loss: A Joint Discussion of Los Angeles and San Francisco Chinatowns

California Historical Society is hosting this panel discussion, inspired by historic photographs of Los Angeles and San Francisco Chinatowns. These images envision, describe, and share a particular idea of what Los Angeles and San Francisco Chinatowns were. The panelists will address questions such as: How did these neighborhoods arise? What challenges have they faced and how have they survived? Moderated by U. C. Berkeley Professor Harvey Dong and featuring former AIISF Executive Director Eddie Wong as a panelist.

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Refugees and Asylum Seekers:  From Angel Island to Now
Nov
15
2:30 PM14:30

Refugees and Asylum Seekers: From Angel Island to Now

  • Bechtel International Community Center, Assembly Room, Stanford University Campus (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In our continuing effort to connect the Angel Island immigration history to contemporary issues, we will explore the little-known stories of refugees and asylum seekers who landed at Angel Island in the early 1900's and compare them against the personal experiences of more recent refugees from Vietnam and Bosnia.  We will also hear from a researcher at the Migration Policy Institute, a think tank based in Washington D.C., who will discuss the U.S. asylum system in crisis and some common-sense steps to chart a way forward.

To attend, sign up at https://goo.gl/forms/uYiOoMH5kMz24nLU2

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Tour & Field Study
Nov
13
8:30 AM08:30

Tour & Field Study

The National Trust for Historic Preservation will host its annual conference, Past Forward, in San Francisco in 2018. As a part of the conference, AIISF is co-leading in a full-day tour and field study of San Francisco's Chinatown and Angel Island Immigration Station, including dim sum lunch at the Chinese Historical Society of America. More details here.

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Immigration Station Tour with APIAHiP
Nov
10
9:45 AM09:45

Immigration Station Tour with APIAHiP

This year the Asian & Pacific Islander Americans in Historic Preservation (APIAHiP) annual forum is in San Francisco. The theme is “Connect. Inspire. Preserve.” As a part of the experience, APIAHiP is offering a tour of Angel Island Immigration Station, focused on the preservation work that was done to restore the structures on site.

For more information and to buy tickets, go to APIAHiP’s website.

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Wild Geese Sorrow
Nov
1
6:00 PM18:00

Wild Geese Sorrow

  • San Francisco Public Library - Main Branch (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Book Talk & Reading

Jeffrey Thomas Leong has written the first new translation of the Angel Island wall inscriptions in 40 years. His work takes readers through the deep anger, sorrow, and loneliness felt by Chinese immigrants detained at the Angel Island Immigration Station between 1910-1940.

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Wild Geese Sorrow
Oct
11
7:00 PM19:00

Wild Geese Sorrow

  • San Francisco Public Library - Sunset Branch (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Book Talk & Reading

Jeffrey Thomas Leong has written the first new translation of the Angel Island wall inscriptions in 40 years. His work takes readers through the deep anger, sorrow, and loneliness felt by Chinese immigrants detained at the Angel Island Immigration Station between 1910-1940.

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Beneath The Surface
Oct
6
to Oct 14

Beneath The Surface

  • YMCA - Chinatown Branch (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Multimedia Experience

AIISF is proud to sponsor Lenora Lee Dance’s world premiere of “Beneath The Surface”, an underwater, multimedia experience. It is a meditation on forgiveness, reconciliation, and redemption, speaking to the power of individuals to transcend.

Three of Lenora Lee's grandparents were detained and processed at the Angel Island Immigration Station. Lenora is deeply grateful to have learned about their journeys and history, in knowing it is part of the rich history of the Chinese and their contributions in this country. Lenora's pivotal immersive performance piece "Within These Walls" (2017) made its debut at the Immigration Station in September 2017. She is planning for its re-staging, along with a sequel, for May 2019.

Go here for ticket information. There will be six performances of this piece.

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Wild Geese Sorrow
Sep
15
2:00 PM14:00

Wild Geese Sorrow

  • San Francisco Public Library - Richmond Branch (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Book Talk & Reading

Jeffrey Thomas Leong has written the first new translation of the Angel Island wall inscriptions in 40 years. His work takes readers through the deep anger, sorrow, and loneliness felt by Chinese immigrants detained at the Angel Island Immigration Station between 1910-1940.

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