Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation

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Poetry on Barrack Walls

Because of the long delays associated with testimonies, living conditions became the focal point of immigrants’ frustrations. Immigrants became prisoners under lock and key 24 hours a day, the barracks had been deemed by public health officials to be a firetrap, the food was barely edible, recreation or time allowed outside was limited, and under such conditions, some even demanded to be returned to China on the next boat out. It was common to hear rumors of suicide by those who were schedule to be deported. The most visible and durable testimony to their suffering are the famous poems, some written, some carved with a classical Cantonese technique into the wooden walls of the barracks. This was not mere graffiti. Couched in classical allegories and historical references, these poems poured forth the aspirations of the immigrants with their anger and sadness at the injustice of their initial reception by America.

Detained in this wooden house for several tens of days,
It is all because of the Mexican exclusion law which implicates me.
It’s a pity heroes have no way of exercising their prowess.
I can only await the word so that I can snap Zu’s whip.

From now on, I am departing far from this building
All of my fellow villagers are rejoicing with me.
Don’t say that everything within is Western styled.
Even if it is built of jade, it has turned into a cage.

– From the walls of Angel Island Immigration Station, author unknown, Poem 69 from Island, p. 134.


ANGEL ISLAND POEMS read in Toishanese

The largest percentage of Chinese immigrants who came to America in the first part of the twentieth century were from Toishan District in Guangdong Province. So too were many of the Chinese immigrants who were detained at Angel Island and Victoria, B.C. and who wrote the poems on the walls of the detention buildings. The following poems, published in Him Mark Lai, Genny Lim, and Judy Yung’s book, Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island, 1910-1940, 2nd edition (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2014), are sung in Toishanese by Yui Poon Ng 伍銳泮 of the Ing Suey Sun Tong Association of Vancouver 溫哥華伍胥山公所. The video recording was produced by Joanne Poon 潘美珠 and donated to the Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation. We greatly appreciate the contributions of Mr. Ng and Ms. Poon.

Poem 3, p. 187

獨坐稅關中,
心內起不痛。
亦因家道貧,
遠遊不近親。
兄弟來到叫,
只得上埠行。
黑鬼無道理,
唐人要掃地。
每日食兩餐,
何時轉回返。

– 辛亥年七月十二日李字題寧邑

Sitting alone in the customs office,
How could my heart not ache?
Had my family not been poor,
I would not have traveled far away from home.
It was my elder brother who urged me
To embark on a voyage to this shore.
The black devil* here is unjust—
He forces the Chinese to clean the floor.
Two meals a day are provided,
But I wonder, when will I be homeward bound?

– Lee from Toishan District, September 4, 1911

* A pejorative to refer to those of African descent—here,
presumably, an African Canadian working at the immigration station
directed the detainees to sweep the floors.

Poem 4, p. 189

妻囑情

出門求財為家窮,
把正心頭在路中。
路上野花君莫取,
為家自有係妻奴。
臨行知囑情千萬,
莫作奴言耳過風。
家中妻兒係莫掛,
勤儉二年掃祖宗。
妻兒衣裳無一件,
米盒掃來無半筒。
家中屋舍無間好,
爛溶爛揸穿爛帘。
夫係昔日都尋賭,
不念奴奴淚飄飄。
多得親兄來打稅,
莫學忘叔大恩公。

– 辛亥七月十二日到李字題寧邑

My Wife’s Admonishment

We are poor, so you’re leaving home to seek wealth;
Keep hold of propriety while on this journey.
Never pick wildflowers along the road,*
For you have your own wife at home!
Before you depart, I admonish you a thousand times;
Don’t let my words just whistle past your ears.
Don’t worry about us, be diligent and frugal,
And two years hence return to sweep the ancestors’ tombs.
Your wife and children haven’t a thing to wear;
Not half a cup of rice can be scooped from the pot.
Our house and rooms are dilapidated;
Our housewares are worn, and the curtains torn.
In the past, you did nothing but gamble;
You never thought of me and my flowing tears.
You are fortunate your elder brother has paid the taxes—
Always remember your great debt to him!

Lee from Toishan District, Arrived July 12, 1911

* To engage in romantic/sexual affairs while away from home.

Poem 7, p. 51

本擬舊歲來美洲,
洋蚨迫阻到初秋。
織女會牛郎哥日,
乃搭林肯總統舟。
餐風嘗浪廿餘日,
幸得平安抵美洲。
以為數日可上埠,
點知苦困木樓囚。
番奴苛待真難受,
感觸家境淚雙流。
但願早登三藩市,
免在此間倍添愁。

Originally, I had intended to come to America last year.
Lack of money delayed me until early autumn.
It was on the day that the Weaver Maiden met the Cowherd*
That I took passage on the President Lincoln.
I ate wind and tasted waves for more than twenty days.
Fortunately, I arrived safely on the American continent.
I thought I could land in a few days.
How was I to know I would become a prisoner suffering in the wooden building?
The barbarians’ abuse is really difficult to take.
When my family’s circumstances stir my emotions, a double stream of tears flows.
I only wish I can land in San Francisco soon,
Thus sparing me this additional sorrow here.

* Better known as the Festival of the Seventh Day of the Seventh
Moon, the Qiqiao Festival is widely celebrated among the Cantonese.
In the legend of the Cowherd and the Weaver Maiden (Niulang Zhinü),
the Weaver Maiden in heaven one day fell in love with a mortal
Cowherd. After their marriage, her loom, which once wove garments
for the gods, fell silent. Angered by her dereliction of duty, the
gods ordered her back to work. She was separated from the Cowherd by
the Silver Stream, or Milky Way, with the Cowherd in the
constellation Aquila, while she was across the Heavenly River in the
constellation Lyra. The couple was allowed to meet only once a year
on the seventh day of the seventh moon, when the Silver Stream is
spanned by a bridge of magpies. On this day, maidens display toys,
figurines, artificial fruits and flowers, embroidery, and other
examples of their handiwork, so that men can judge their skills. It
is also customary for girls to worship the gods and make offerings
of fruit to them.

Poem 10, p. 55

香山許生勉客題

說去花旗喜溢顏,
千金羅掘不辭艱。
親離有話喉先哽,
妻別多情淚對潸。

 

浪大如山頻駭客,
政苛似虎倍嘗蠻。
毋忘此日君登岸,
發奮前程莫懶閒。

Poem by One Named Huie from Heungshan Encouraging the Traveler

Just talk about going to the land of the Flowery Flag and my
countenance fills with happiness.
Not without hard work were one thousand pieces of gold dug up and
gathered together.
There were words of farewell to the parents, but the throat choked
up first.
There were many feelings, many tears flowing face to face, when
parting with the wife.

Waves big as mountains often astonished this traveler.
With laws harsh as tigers,* I had a taste of all the barbarities.
Do not forget this day when you land ashore.
Push yourself ahead and do not be lazy or idle.

* From “Tangong,” a chapter in the Book of Rites: Confucius was
passing Mount Tai and saw a woman weeping and wailing at a grave.
Confucius asked why she was wailing so sadly. She said, “My father-
in-law and my husband were killed by tigers. Now my son has also
been killed by a tiger.” Confucius asked why she didn’t leave this
dangerous place. She replied that it was because there was no
oppressive rule here. Confucius remarked, “Oppressive rule is surely
fiercer than any tiger.”

Poem 24, p. 67

深夜偶感

夜靜微聞風嘯聲,
形影傷情見景詠。
雲霧潺潺也暗天,
蟲聲唧唧月微明。
悲苦相連天相遣,
愁人獨坐倚窗邊。

台山余題

Random Thoughts Deep at Night

In the quiet of night, I heard, faintly, the whistling of wind.
The forms and shadows saddened me; upon seeing the landscape, I
composed a poem.
The floating clouds, the fog, darken the sky.
The moon shines faintly as the insects chirp.
Grief and bitterness entwined are heaven sent.
The sad person sits alone, leaning by a window.

Written by Yee of Toishan

Poem 41, p. 81

牢籠躍入出無能,
無任傷悲血淚橫。
精衛啣砂填夙恨,
征鴻訴月哀頻生。
子卿絕域誰憐問?
阮籍途窮空哭行。
芳草幽蘭怨凋落,
那時方得任升騰?

台邑李鏡波題

After leaping into prison, I cannot come out.
From endless sorrows, tears and blood streak.
The jingwei bird carries gravel to fill its old grudge.*
The migrating wild goose complains to the moon, mourning his harried life.
When Ziqing was in distant lands, who pitied and inquired after him?**
When Ruan Ji reached the end of the road, he shed futile tears.***
The scented grass and hidden orchids complain of withering and falling.
When may I be allowed to soar at my own pleasing?

By Lee Gengbo of Toishan

* According to a folktale, the daughter of the legendary Yandi
was drowned while playing in the Eastern Sea. Her soul changed into
a bird called a jingwei, which, resenting the fact that the ocean
had taken her life, carried pebbles from the Western Mountains in
her beak and dropped them into the ocean, hoping to fill it up.

** Another name for Su Wu (140–60 BCE), who, during the Western
Han dynasty (206 BCE–24 CE), was sent by the Chinese government as
envoy to the Xiongnu, a nomadic people north of the Chinese empire.
Su Wu was detained there for nineteen years but refused to renounce
his loyalty to the Han emperor.

*** Ruan Ji (210–263), a scholar during the period of the Three
Kingdoms (220–80), enjoyed drinking and visiting mountains and
streams. Often, when he reached the end of the road, he would cry
bitterly before turning back.

Poem 43, p. 83

囚困木屋天復天,
自由束縛豈堪言?
舉目誰歡惟靜坐,
關心自悶不成眠。
日永樽空愁莫解,
夜長枕冷倩誰憐?
參透箇中孤苦味,
何如歸去學耕田?

Imprisoned in the wooden building day after day,
My freedom withheld; how can I bear to talk about it?
I look to see who is happy, but they only sit quietly.
I am anxious and depressed and cannot fall asleep.
The days are long and the bottle constantly empty;
my sad mood, even so, is not dispelled.
Nights are long and the pillow cold; who can pity my loneliness?
After experiencing such loneliness and sorrow,
Why not just return home and learn to plow the fields?


Click to hear readings of Chinese poems in Cantonese and English

http://www.poeticwaves.net (Mandarin)

http://www.kqed.org/w/pacificlink/history/angelisland/poetry/one.html (Mandarin and Cantonese)


 

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